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101 Age: 86 Herborth, Christlieb (I416)
 
102 Age: 86 Weitzel, Heinrich (I465)
 
103 Age: 89 Hillebrecht, Caroline (I257)
 
104 Age: 90 Burrows, Victoria (I1164)
 
105 Age: 95 Reeves, George (I715)
 
106 Anglican Parish Registers. Marriage Bonds and Allegations. Somerset Archives & Local Studies, South West Heritage Trust, Taunton, England. Source (S96)
 
107 Anglican Parish Registers. Somerset Archives & Local Studies, South West Heritage Trust, Taunton, England. Source (S99)
 
108 Anglican Parish Registers. Somerset Archives & Local Studies, South West Heritage Trust, Taunton, England. Source (S100)
 
109 ARMSTRONG, Elizabeth (Betty) (nee Tompkins) Aug 2, 1917 - Feb 23, 2009 Peacefully in Smith Falls hospital, in her 92nd year. Daughter of the late Minnie and Harry Tompkins, and predeceased by her sisters Thirza and Isobel and brothers Leslie and Pat. Betty was born in Montreal and was the loving wife of John Armstrong until his passing in 1987. Along with raising a family, this remarkable lady made her mark in business, sports and volunteer activities. She ran several successful businesses, was an avid golfer and carried out volunteer hospital duties until her late 80's. She had a vibrancy and sense of humour that captivated all who knew her and stayed with her throughout. She lived a full life and in her words, "left nothing in the bag". Cherished mother of Judy (Jim Robinson) of Long Sault, Linda Rooney of Aiken, South Carolina, Mark (Nancy) of Ottawa and special Aunt to Jeannie Vickers of Collingwood, Ont. Fondly remembered by her grandchildren Chris, Jennifer, Julie, Jamie, Greg, Jeff and great grandkids Benjamin, Katie, MacKenzie, Justin and Emilie. A private family service will be held in the spring. Memorial donations can be made to the Alzheimer Society of Ottawa.
 
Tompkins, Elizabeth (I1184)
 
110 Arteriosclerosis Dawe, Anna E Polk (I850)
 
111 At the age of fourteen, Charlotte was youngest child to immigrate with Frederick Wicke and Louisa Luedeke from Lagerhausen, Hanover State, Germany in 1846. Here parents names are recorded on page 3, item number 6, of the Church records for 1st St. John's, Seebach's Hill. Following their names, in the column where children are listed, are two birth dates. The first is her brother August H.'s birth date and the next is Charlotte's.

In this same Church book, on page 13, the birth (Aug 1, 1854) and baptism (Nov 21, 1854) of Ludwig Freier and Charlotte Wicke's first child, Wilhelm, is recorded. A second child, Maria Elizabeth, born to Ludwig and Charlotte on Jun 18, 1856, and baptized on Dec 7, 1856, is recorded on page 17.

In the deaths section of the Church records for Totness (now 2nd St. John's, Wartburg), Charlotte Freier, wife of Ludwig Freier of Mecklenburg is recorded to have died two days before her 30th birthday on Jan 6, 1862. 
Wicke, Charolette (I520)
 
112 At the age of fourteen, Charlotte was youngest child to immigrate with Frederick Wicke and Louisa Luedeke from Lagerhausen, Hanover State, Germany in 1846. Here parents names are recorded on page 3, item number 6, of the Church records for 1st St. John's, Seebach's Hill. Following their names, in the column where children are listed, are two birth dates. The first is her brother August H.'s birth date and the next is Charlotte's. In this same Church book, on page 13, the birth (Aug 1, 1854) and baptism (Nov 21, 1854) of Ludwig Freier and Charlotte Wicke's first child, Wilhelm, is recorded. A second child, Maria Elizabeth, born to Ludwig and Charlotte on Jun 18, 1856, and baptized on Dec 7, 1856, is recorded on page 17. In the deaths section of the Church records for Totness (now 2nd St. John's, Wartburg), Charlotte Freier, wife of Ludwig Freier of Mecklenburg is recorded to have died two days before her 30th birthday on Jan 6, 1862. Wicke, Charolette (I663)
 
113 August immigrated in 1845 from Denkershausen, Hanover, Germany with his parents and siblings Famme, George Heinrich Augustus Jr (I528)
 
114 August immigrated in 1845 from Denkershausen, Hanover, Germany with his parents and siblings Famme, George Heinrich Augustus Jr (I671)
 
115 Biography
Sippel, Christine J., nee Fisher; Peacefully passed away with loved ones by her side on October 11, 2008 at Brampton Civic Hospital in her 81st year. Leaving behind to celebrate her life is her husband Lorne and her children Judy Noble of Stratford, Brian (Nancy) Sippel of Stroud, Deborah(Dan Griffith) of Invermere, B.C., John Russell(Dianne) of Lambton Shores, Wayne Sippel(Rody) of Stratford, Grace(Rick Strachan) of Lenexa KS., and Mary Russell of London ONT. Grandma will always be in the hearts of her 14 grandchildren and 9 great-grandchildren. Survived by her sisters Grace Johnson of Dwight IL., and Catherine (Russell Yausie) of Tavistock, and predeceased by her sister Mary White and brothers Alex, Donald and George Fisher.

Christine will be missed by all and loved forever.

A Memorial Service to be held on Monday October 20, 2008 at 2:00 p.m., with visitation one hour prior, in the Chapel of Andrews Community Funeral Centre, 8190 Dixie Rd., Brampton (N. of Steeles Ave.)(905)-456-8190. Tributes to the family may be made at www.mem.com
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Christine (Chris) was the daughter of John D. and Edna Fisher of Shakespeare Ontario. John was the Clerk of South Easthope Township in Perth County for 50 years until his untimely death in 1949. He was actively involved in the political events of his time and Christine, no doubt, picked up her life long interest through him.

Edna moved the family into Stratford after John's passing. Here, Christine finished her business education, entered the work force and met Lawrence Russell. They married in 1951 and resided in Edna's house at 85 Dufferin Street. In 1952, Deborah was born, followed closely after in 1953 by John. They were followed by Grace in 1955 and Mary in 1957. Troubles, however entered the marriage and Lawrence left Christine in 1961.

For the next 8 years, Christine worked to support her family as a single mom. Her mother Edna was the rock by her side during this time and taught the 4 children, the things that Christine and her siblings had learned a generation earlier. In 1968, Edna passed on after a lengthy battle with cancer.

That year, Chris started spending time with Lorne Sippel. Lorne had lost his wife to illness and like Christine was looking to fill a void. In no time they became an 'item' and by the summer of '69 were ready to get married. This instantly created a large family of 7 children. Lorne's daughter Judy was married and brothers Brian and Wayne were still at home.

For ten years, Lorne and Chris resided at 85 Dufferin, until a promotion for Lorne at Cooper-Bessemer, necessitated a move to the Toronto area. They picked the A section of Bramalea in Brampton where they have resided ever since.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Chris was many things but mostly she was full of life. Her interests were many and she was as interested in the success of others as much or probably more than her own.

In the early fifties she was a member of the Stratford Little Theatre which preceded the famous festival of today. Chris was an active member and president, for a time, of the Shakespeare Public School Home and School Association. She was, over the years, an active fund raiser and canvasser for the Heart and Stroke Foundation, the Diabetes Association and the Cancer Society. Lorne and Chris, together, were active volunteers and contributors with the Lambton Heritage Museum and the Lake Smith Conservationists. One thing she never joined was a Seniors club which she considered to be for others, unlike busy Lorne and her.

Christine loved the english language. There were few who could talk up a storm like her. Her opinions were many and they were current. She could and would make her points forcefully and unlike the rest of the world which kept sex, politics and religion away from the kitchen table, Chris encouraged those subjects and others to be discussed and enjoyed the results. She enjoyed word play and puns, good jokes, editorial cartoons and good interviews. Broad British comedy with great dialogue would set her off even if she had the script memorized from too many viewings.

Her opinions were also broad and well thought out. Christine was an inveterate reader who kept on top of issues, locally, nationally or internationally through her daily perusing of the Star. This was augmented by CBC radio news and current affairs, Charlie Rose on PBS, Lloyd on CTV and Peter on CBC TV. She could discuss Darfur, the Taliban or Timor as readily as Obama or Dion. She had some problems with certain names like Harper but it might have been brain cramps.

Christine's politics were liberal. LARGE L and small l. A passionate defender of the social benefits that Canada gives her citizens and one who knew from experience what it was like to be at the short end, her arguments were impassioned but reasoned. She could not abide public figures who were not empathetic to their electors. She believed in a civil service that was civil and gave service. Her father taught her well and she passed on these lessons to those who would listen.

She had her public heroes. Names such as Charlotte Whitton, Judy Lamarsh and of course, Mayor Hazel McCallion were often mentioned as inspiring leaders. Chris had a special fondness for Pierre Elliot Trudeau and Leonard Cohen but the one who gave her the most joy was June Callwood. Her passing recently was a blow as Chris figured she was just getting her second wind. The optimism of the ageless.

Christine's reading only started with the newspaper and magazines. Her real passion was books. So many books had she read over the years, that she had a series of black books listing the hundreds of authors and the thousands of books. Chris shared this interest as with many other things with Lorne. It was assumed that they both had a majority stake in the Brampton Public Library such was the service they received. Two days before her passing, the library phoned to say the latest order was already in. She loved to read to children and many memories of mother, grandmother and great grandmother Chris will be of a book, her lap and that voice.

One of the greatest gifts Christine received from her mother Edna was the love of Gardening. This love has now been passed down three more generations. The gardens that she took over from her mother in Stratford were added to and changed to Lorne's and her liking over their ten years together there. But the best was yet to come.

Over the next thirty years in Brampton, their yard, through perseverance, good planning and hard work became a showpiece on their street. From trellises with roses and clematis to wild gardens with solomon seal and trilliums, from boulevard rock gardens scavenged from their many trips north to formal annual beds, from vegetable beds bulging with produce to miniature rock garden specimens, from formal hedges to graceful shade trees, from grape vine grottoes to heavy laden fruit trees, it was all there. A place of peace and beauty. A place that made strangers stop and look. A place that neighbours came to see the weekly and monthly changes. A place that eventually won them awards for three straight years from the local Horticultural Society. The first one came when Chris was 76 and Lorne was 78. Just starting out in the business. An inspiration to all.

The gardens also were home to another passion. The annual Halloween decorating extravaganza. Always changing, never the same ,the decorating got Chris in the mood for all the young goblins who were out trick or treating for the night. She liked to find who they were and what they were and where they lived. A guess that went around was that it was really a trick on Chris's part to keep them long enough to ingest their youthful spirit for her nefarious ends. HOOHaHa

Chris made good use of the produce that came from their gardens and the local markets. Her preserves were many and were much anticipated gifts. From chili sauces to jams and jellies, the factory kitchen was always producing in season. When the harvest ended , it was time for the annual Christmas cookie baking bee which lasted for months. The volume of cookies produced was astounding and the tastes were even better. Chris's best was her shortbread and your cookie tin would have a few but never enough. The family was big you know, everyone should get a share.

One funny thing that has been pointed out about the last 15 or so years is how little Christine cooked. Baked yes. Preserves yes. But cooking not so much. Her explanation was always the same or a variation on this. I never was a good cook. Lorne is so much better. He likes to cook. I don't and I just did cause I had too. Excuses ? Maybe. But the truth was out there for all to see. Lorne by a landslide.

When you look back over time, one thing that you notice is how busy people really are. No wonder Chris and Lorne never joined a seniors club. They never had time. Besides the things mentioned above, they entertained , they played lots of cards, they went out to dinner lots of times, they toured the countryside locally and nationally lots of times, they payed their taxes at the casinos lots of times and once and awhile got a refund, they visited their relatives and partied with friends, they went fishing and caught lots of fish, and they laughed. They laughed a lot. They bickered too. But they laughed. They laughed with each other and at each other. They laughed with their friends and their relatives. They enjoyed life together. They were in love and it showed. It was as bright and beautiful as their gardens. It was an inspiration to all. 
Fisher, Christine (I082)
 
116 Biography & Image:
http://www.newble.co.uk/candlish/biography.html 
Candlish, Reverend Robert Smith (I3121)
 
117 Biography & Image: http://www.newble.co.uk/candlish/biography.html wikisource biography: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Candlish,_Robert_Smith_(DNB00) See wiki page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Smith_Candlish Candlish, Reverend Robert Smith (I3075)
 
118 Biography Sippel, Christine J., nee Fisher; Peacefully passed away with loved ones by her side on October 11, 2008 at Brampton Civic Hospital in her 81st year. Leaving behind to celebrate her life is her husband Lorne and her children Judy Noble of Stratford, Brian (Nancy) Sippel of Stroud, Deborah(Dan Griffith) of Invermere, B.C., John Russell(Dianne) of Lambton Shores, Wayne Sippel(Rody) of Stratford, Grace(Rick Strachan) of Lenexa KS., and Mary Russell of London ONT. Grandma will always be in the hearts of her 14 grandchildren and 9 great-grandchildren. Survived by her sisters Grace Johnson of Dwight IL., and Catherine (Russell Yausie) of Tavistock, and predeceased by her sister Mary White and brothers Alex, Donald and George Fisher. Christine will be missed by all and loved forever. A Memorial Service to be held on Monday October 20, 2008 at 2:00 p.m., with visitation one hour prior, in the Chapel of Andrews Community Funeral Centre, 8190 Dixie Rd., Brampton (N. of Steeles Ave.)(905)-456-8190. Tributes to the family may be made at www.mem.com ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Christine (Chris) was the daughter of John D. and Edna Fisher of Shakespeare Ontario. John was the Clerk of South Easthope Township in Perth County for 50 years until his untimely death in 1949. He was actively involved in the political events of his time and Christine, no doubt, picked up her life long interest through him. Edna moved the family into Stratford after John's passing. Here, Christine finished her business education, entered the work force and met Lawrence Russell. They married in 1951 and resided in Edna's house at 85 Dufferin Street. In 1952, Deborah was born, followed closely after in 1953 by John. They were followed by Grace in 1955 and Mary in 1957. Troubles, however entered the marriage and Lawrence left Christine in 1961. For the next 8 years, Christine worked to support her family as a single mom. Her mother Edna was the rock by her side during this time and taught the 4 children, the things that Christine and her siblings had learned a generation earlier. In 1968, Edna passed on after a lengthy battle with cancer. That year, Chris started spending time with Lorne Sippel. Lorne had lost his wife to illness and like Christine was looking to fill a void. In no time they became an 'item' and by the summer of '69 were ready to get married. This instantly created a large family of 7 children. Lorne's daughter Judy was married and brothers Brian and Wayne were still at home. For ten years, Lorne and Chris resided at 85 Dufferin, until a promotion for Lorne at Cooper-Bessemer, necessitated a move to the Toronto area. They picked the A section of Bramalea in Brampton where they have resided ever since. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Chris was many things but mostly she was full of life. Her interests were many and she was as interested in the success of others as much or probably more than her own. In the early fifties she was a member of the Stratford Little Theatre which preceded the famous festival of today. Chris was an active member and president, for a time, of the Shakespeare Public School Home and School Association. She was, over the years, an active fund raiser and canvasser for the Heart and Stroke Foundation, the Diabetes Association and the Cancer Society. Lorne and Chris, together, were active volunteers and contributors with the Lambton Heritage Museum and the Lake Smith Conservationists. One thing she never joined was a Seniors club which she considered to be for others, unlike busy Lorne and her. Christine loved the english language. There were few who could talk up a storm like her. Her opinions were many and they were current. She could and would make her points forcefully and unlike the rest of the world which kept sex, politics and religion away from the kitchen table, Chris encouraged those subjects and others to be discussed and enjoyed the results. She enjoyed word play and puns, good jokes, editorial cartoons and good interviews. Broad British comedy with great dialogue would set her off even if she had the script memorized from too many viewings. Her opinions were also broad and well thought out. Christine was an inveterate reader who kept on top of issues, locally, nationally or internationally through her daily perusing of the Star. This was augmented by CBC radio news and current affairs, Charlie Rose on PBS, Lloyd on CTV and Peter on CBC TV. She could discuss Darfur, the Taliban or Timor as readily as Obama or Dion. She had some problems with certain names like Harper but it might have been brain cramps. Christine's politics were liberal. LARGE L and small l. A passionate defender of the social benefits that Canada gives her citizens and one who knew from experience what it was like to be at the short end, her arguments were impassioned but reasoned. She could not abide public figures who were not empathetic to their electors. She believed in a civil service that was civil and gave service. Her father taught her well and she passed on these lessons to those who would listen. She had her public heroes. Names such as Charlotte Whitton, Judy Lamarsh and of course, Mayor Hazel McCallion were often mentioned as inspiring leaders. Chris had a special fondness for Pierre Elliot Trudeau and Leonard Cohen but the one who gave her the most joy was June Callwood. Her passing recently was a blow as Chris figured she was just getting her second wind. The optimism of the ageless. Christine's reading only started with the newspaper and magazines. Her real passion was books. So many books had she read over the years, that she had a series of black books listing the hundreds of authors and the thousands of books. Chris shared this interest as with many other things with Lorne. It was assumed that they both had a majority stake in the Brampton Public Library such was the service they received. Two days before her passing, the library phoned to say the latest order was already in. She loved to read to children and many memories of mother, grandmother and great grandmother Chris will be of a book, her lap and that voice. One of the greatest gifts Christine received from her mother Edna was the love of Gardening. This love has now been passed down three more generations. The gardens that she took over from her mother in Stratford were added to and changed to Lorne's and her liking over their ten years together there. But the best was yet to come. Over the next thirty years in Brampton, their yard, through perseverance, good planning and hard work became a showpiece on their street. From trellises with roses and clematis to wild gardens with solomon seal and trilliums, from boulevard rock gardens scavenged from their many trips north to formal annual beds, from vegetable beds bulging with produce to miniature rock garden specimens, from formal hedges to graceful shade trees, from grape vine grottoes to heavy laden fruit trees, it was all there. A place of peace and beauty. A place that made strangers stop and look. A place that neighbours came to see the weekly and monthly changes. A place that eventually won them awards for three straight years from the local Horticultural Society. The first one came when Chris was 76 and Lorne was 78. Just starting out in the business. An inspiration to all. The gardens also were home to another passion. The annual Halloween decorating extravaganza. Always changing, never the same ,the decorating got Chris in the mood for all the young goblins who were out trick or treating for the night. She liked to find who they were and what they were and where they lived. A guess that went around was that it was really a trick on Chris's part to keep them long enough to ingest their youthful spirit for her nefarious ends. HOOHaHa Chris made good use of the produce that came from their gardens and the local markets. Her preserves were many and were much anticipated gifts. From chili sauces to jams and jellies, the factory kitchen was always producing in season. When the harvest ended , it was time for the annual Christmas cookie baking bee which lasted for months. The volume of cookies produced was astounding and the tastes were even better. Chris's best was her shortbread and your cookie tin would have a few but never enough. The family was big you know, everyone should get a share. One funny thing that has been pointed out about the last 15 or so years is how little Christine cooked. Baked yes. Preserves yes. But cooking not so much. Her explanation was always the same or a variation on this. I never was a good cook. Lorne is so much better. He likes to cook. I don't and I just did cause I had too. Excuses ? Maybe. But the truth was out there for all to see. Lorne by a landslide. When you look back over time, one thing that you notice is how busy people really are. No wonder Chris and Lorne never joined a seniors club. They never had time. Besides the things mentioned above, they entertained , they played lots of cards, they went out to dinner lots of times, they toured the countryside locally and nationally lots of times, they payed their taxes at the casinos lots of times and once and awhile got a refund, they visited their relatives and partied with friends, they went fishing and caught lots of fish, and they laughed. They laughed a lot. They bickered too. But they laughed. They laughed with each other and at each other. They laughed with their friends and their relatives. They enjoyed life together. They were in love and it showed. It was as bright and beautiful as their gardens. It was an inspiration to all. Fisher, Christine (I232)
 
119 Birth within barracks - 69th Reg of Foot Solley, William (I924)
 
120 Birth, marriage, and death - dates and information... (MarionB) (dap) Young, Catherine (I746)
 
121 Birth, marriage, and death - dates and information... (MarionB) (dap) Young, Catherine (I835)
 
122 Blacksmith Pike, Richard (I406)
 
123 Blacksmith Pike, Richard (I356)
 
124 Born 12 weeks premature

Bemerkungen: "12 Wochen zu früh geboren"  
Harborth, Anna Elisabeth (I3161)
 
125 Born 12 weeks premature Bemerkungen: "12 Wochen zu früh geboren" Harborth, Anna Elisabeth (I3115)
 
126 Born in St-Lambert, Que., he became interested in art while at high school and later attended the Montreal Museum of Fine Art School and studied under Goodridge Roberts, Jacques de Tonnancour, and Gordon Webber [1948-49]. He also studied at the Ontario College of Art under Jock MacDonald, Eric Freifeld, Harley Parker and Frederick Hagan [1949-53]. He won an IODE prize and a T. Eaton travel scholarship in 1953 and took a trip to France and Spain [1954-55]. In France he studied the work of Pierre Bonnard and Alberto Giacometti (their work was to be very influential). He worked for Graphica Associates, Toronto [1955] and then at the graphics department of the CBC. His painting “Night Interior” was included in the Second Biennial Exhibition of Canadian Art [1957]. He taught part-time at the OCA for two years [1958-60]. In 1959 Coughtry finally left the CBC and began to work on mural commissions. His work received critical praise from writers Robert Fulford and Elizabeth Kilbourn. In 1962 he made a large mu Coughtry, John Graham (I101)
 
127 Born in St-Lambert, Que., he became interested in art while at high school and later attended the Montreal Museum of Fine Art School and studied under Goodridge Roberts, Jacques de Tonnancour, and Gordon Webber [1948-49]. He also studied at the Ontario College of Art under Jock MacDonald, Eric Freifeld, Harley Parker and Frederick Hagan [1949-53]. He won an IODE prize and a T. Eaton travel scholarship in 1953 and took a trip to France and Spain [1954-55]. In France he studied the work of Pierre Bonnard and Alberto Giacometti (their work was to be very influential). He worked for Graphica Associates, Toronto [1955] and then at the graphics department of the CBC. His painting ``Night Interior´´ was included in the Second Biennial Exhibition of Canadian Art [1957]. He taught part-time at the OCA for two years [1958-60]. In 1959 Coughtry finally left the CBC and began to work on mural commissions. His work received critical praise from writers Robert Fulford and Elizabeth Kilbourn. In 1962 he made a large mu
 
Coughtry, John Graham (I101)
 
128 Cabinet Maker
 
Tompkins, William Richard (I1163)
 
129 Cabinet Maker Tompkins, William Richard (I1187)
 
130 Came to Canada ~1847; Lot 7 Concession 5 Downie Twnsp, Perth County, Ontario
 
Pike, John (I352)
 
131 Came to Canada ~1847; Lot 7 Concession 5 Downie Twnsp, Perth County, Ontario Pike, John (I402)
 
132 Canada West Dawe, John George (I904)
 
133 Cemetery: BENY-SUR-MER CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY Calvados,France

Grave Reference: XIV. C. 11.

Location: Beny-sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery is about 1 kilometre east of the village of Reviers, on the Creully-Tailleville-Ouistreham road (D.35). Reviers is a village and commune in the Department of the Calvados. It is located 15 kilometres north-west of Caen and 18 kilometres east of Bayeux and 3.5 kilometres south of Courseulles, a village on the sea coast. The village of Beny-sur-Mer is some 2 kilometres south-east of the cemetery. The bus service between Caen and Arromanches (via Reviers and Ver-sur-Mer) passes the cemetery.

It was on the coast just to the north that the 3rd Canadian Division landed on 6th June 1944; on that day, 335 officers and men of that division were killed in action or died of wounds. In this cemetery are the graves of Canadians who gave their lives in the landings in Normandy and in the earlier stages of the subsequent campaign. Canadians who died during the final stages of the fighting in Normandy are buried in Bretteville-sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery. There are a total of 2048 burials in Beny-sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery. There is also one special memorial erected to a soldier of the Canadian Infantry Corps who is known to have been buried in this cemetery, but the exact site of whose grave could not be located.

 
Weitzel, Francis Roy (I3094)
 
134 Cemetery: BENY-SUR-MER CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY Calvados,France Grave Reference: XIV. C. 11. Location: Beny-sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery is about 1 kilometre east of the village of Reviers, on the Creully-Tailleville-Ouistreham road (D.35). Reviers is a village and commune in the Department of the Calvados. It is located 15 kilometres north-west of Caen and 18 kilometres east of Bayeux and 3.5 kilometres south of Courseulles, a village on the sea coast. The village of Beny-sur-Mer is some 2 kilometres south-east of the cemetery. The bus service between Caen and Arromanches (via Reviers and Ver-sur-Mer) passes the cemetery. It was on the coast just to the north that the 3rd Canadian Division landed on 6th June 1944; on that day, 335 officers and men of that division were killed in action or died of wounds. In this cemetery are the graves of Canadians who gave r lives in the landings in Normandy and in the earlier stages of the subsequent campaign. Canadians who died during the final stages of the fighting in Normandy are buried in Bretteville-sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery. There are a total of 2048 burials in Beny-sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery. There is also one special memorial erected to a soldier of the Canadian Infantry Corps who is known to have been buried in this cemetery, but the exact site of whose grave could not be located. Military Service: Service Number: A/38237 Force: Army Unit: Highland Light Infantry of Canada, R.C.I.C. Weitzel, Francis Roy (I3048)
 
135 Christening: 13-Sep-1844, Saint Nicholas, Aberdeen, Scotland Anderson, John (I1672)
 
136 Confirmation: Edesheim, 10.05.1743  Harborth, Johann Christian (I3163)
 
137 Confirmation: Edesheim, 10.05.1743 Harborth, Johann Christian (I3117)
 
138 Confirmation: Hammenstedt, 01.05.1746  Harborth, Ilse Catharina (I3164)
 
139 Confirmation: Hammenstedt, 01.05.1746 Harborth, Ilse Catharina (I3118)
 
140 Conrad Meyer was born in the little village Hajen, Germany. On 30 JUN 1848, Conrad got a passport from the Kingdom Hannover to emigrate with his family to America. Members of his family were: his spouse Caroline Mensing, aged 38, and their children Caroline, Wilhelmine, Louise and Friedrich.

They were accompanied by 23 year old Christian Riechers, an illegitimate son of a man in the town Münder in Germany and of Friederike Mensing, who was married with the mason Friedrich Stege. The Stege family (with 5 children) already emigrated in 1846 to America.

They traveled on the ship MARIE, which arrived 28 JULY 1846 in New York. Other families from the Beber area included on the ship were: Meiners, Westermann, Klinge, Schmidt, Kütemeyer, Hansmann, David Milius, Heinrich Rodenbeck with Sophie Kruse and their 3 years old son Heinrich.  
Meyer, Konrad (I1356)
 
141 Corporal WILLIAM CREARIE

2827289, 2nd Bn., Seaforth Highlanders
who died age 28
on 06 April 1943
Son of John and Jane Crearie, of Glasgow; husband of Elizabeth Crearie, of Glasgow.
Remembered with honour
SFAX WAR CEMETERY

Killed in action in North Africa; Scout in the Seaforth Highlanders

In May 1943, the war in North Africa came to an end in Tunisia with the defeat of the Axis powers by a combined Allied force. In the south, the Axis forces defeated in Egypt at El Alamein withdrew into Tunisia along the coast through Libya, pursued by the Allied Eighth Army. Most of those buried in Sfax War Cemetery died in attacks on successive Axis positions at Medenine, the Marith Line and Wadi Akarit, in March and April 1943. The cemetery contains 1,253 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 52 of them unidentified. The single First World War grave in Sfax War Cemetery was brought in from Bizerta Sidi Saleru Moslem Cemetery in March 1983. There is also 1 Greek soldier of the 1939-45 war buried here.
 
Crearie, William (I400)
 
142 Corporal WILLIAM CREARIE

2827289, 2nd Bn., Seaforth Highlanders
who died age 28
on 06 April 1943 (Battle of Wadi Akarit)
Son of John and Jane Crearie, of Glasgow; husband of Elizabeth Crearie, of Glasgow.
Remembered with honour
SFAX WAR CEMETERY

Killed in action in North Africa; Scout in the Seaforth Highlanders

In May 1943, the war in North Africa came to an end in Tunisia with the defeat of the Axis powers by a combined Allied force. In the south, the Axis forces defeated in Egypt at El Alamein withdrew into Tunisia along the coast through Libya, pursued by the Allied Eighth Army. Most of those buried in Sfax War Cemetery died in attacks on successive Axis positions at Medenine, the Marith Line and Wadi Akarit, in March and April 1943. The cemetery contains 1,253 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 52 of them unidentified. The single First World War grave in Sfax War Cemetery was brought in from Bizerta Sidi Saleru Moslem Cemetery in March 1983. There is also 1 Greek soldier of the 1939-45 war buried here. 
Crearie, William (I454)
 
143 Daniel Herborth (Herbert), leased Con. 3 Lot 32 in 1847; the original leasee was George Ash. He then purchased the lot in 1854. It was then owned by Christel (Christlieb) Herborth in 1872, Norman Herborth in 1917, Franklin & Gordon A. Herborth in 1937, Gordon A. Herborth in 1947, and in 1966 was sold to Hillock Farms Ltd. (Gordon Herborth & Sons).

Excerpt from "Echoes of Ellice; Ellice Township 1827-1987):

"Daniel and Amelia (Meinecke) Herborth had five children. The first four were born in Hammenstedt, Hanover, Germany: Wilhelmine, born 1835 (married William Bode, lived in Logan Township); August born 1840 (later married Annie Reeves); Christian, born 1841 (later married Amelia Hennick); and Amelia (married George Barth, went to Iowa). August and Christian took up land in Logan Township and later changed the spelling of their name to Herbert.

The Herborth's came to Canada in 1847, and they had another child in this country Christlieb (Christel) born Christmas Day 1851 (married Sophia Maria Frier, took over this farm and Lot 31, Concession 4).

Daniel was listed as a day labourer when he came to Canada, but he had previously been in the army in Germany. It was probably then that he learned something about the medical profession. Here in Canada he was sometimes called upon to render such service. One story has it that, when an Irishman from Kinkora came here to have a tooth pulled, Daniel gave him a swig of whisky and told him to hold it in his mouth while the extraction took place. However, in a few seconds the man said that it had slipped and he had swallowed it. So Daniel gave him another swig, only to have the same thing happen again. This happened four or five times, until the man was ready to have his tooth pulled.

The first house on this farm was a single-storey log residence built by George Esch, probably in 1842. That house and a log barn were near the east side of the farm, and around them an orchard was planted. The second house, a 1 1/2-storey frame house, was built in about 1875. It was closer to the road and farther west than the log house. It is said the frame house was burned in the late 1890's, and the present red-brick house was then built by Christel Herborth to replace it. After the frame house was built, Daniel and Amelia lived in the log house. Daniel died in 1876, Amelia in 1895. The large bank barn, west of the log house and north of the frame house, was here until 1990.

Christlieb and Sophia had four children: Catherine, 1881-1886 (died of diphtheria); Frank, 1884-1950 (married Emma Schellenberger, lived on Lot 31, Con. 2); Eleanora, 1887-1954 (married William Eisler, lived in Logan Township); and Norman, 1891-1937 (married Irene Rock of Brodhage, lived on this farm). Norman died in January 1937; his father Christel died in Dec. of the same year.

The Herborth's were better-than-average farmers. They had good crops and the best of livestock, accommodated in painted barns with immaculate barnyards. In 1917, Norman and Irene took over this farm. They had no children. Norman was one of the first farmers to use chemical fertilizer. Because his crops were usually better than his neighbours', others soon followed his example. After Norman's death, in 1937, ownership of the farm went to his brother Frank and Frank's son Gordon. They farmed it, along with their property on Lot 31, Con. 2. After Gordon married in 1939, Frank and his wife Emma lived in the house here. When Frank died in 1950, Emma moved to Stratford. In 1947, title of this farm went to Gordon Herborth and in 1966 to Hillock Farms Ltd., of which Gordon and his sons were the principals. The Herborth's severed the red-brick house and an acre from this property in 1965. Hans and Angelica Diemand bought this farm in 1973 and, with their sons, they operated it until 1977."
 
Harborth, Johann Christian Daniel (I018)
 
144 Died 6mths after birth Frier, Karl Heinrich (I565)
 
145 Died 6mths after birth Frier, Karl Heinrich (I508)
 
146 Died as a child on the family farm home Herbert, Donald Morris (I1053)
 
147 Died as a child on the family farm home Herbert, Donald Morris (I1030)
 
148 Died in a car crash on Hwy 8 (near Mitchell, ON) during a winter storm.
 
Herborth, Lyle Gordon (I412)
 
149 Died in a car crash on Hwy 8 (near Mitchell, ON) during a winter storm. Herborth, Lyle Gordon (I012)
 
150 Died in a head-on car crash on Hwy 8 during a snowstorm. Herborth, Lyle Gordon (I012)
 

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